A Lasting Approach to Chronic Pain Relief by Sarah Warren, CSE

April 1, 2013 Articles
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This article was originally published in Natural Awakenings Magazine. It’s reported that approximately 100 million Americans, representing about third of the population, suffer from chronic pain. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) concluded that, despite increasing dollars spent on treating back and neck pain, there was no improvement in the […]

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Seven Tips for Injury-Free Running by Sarah Warren, CSE

March 31, 2013 Articles
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I’ve compiled these tips for preventing running injuries based on Somatics, ChiRunning, and personal experience. If you plan to make changes to your running form, take it slow and try one of these tips at a time. When one adjustment starts to feel natural, move on to the next. Happy running! 1. Relax and stay […]

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Five Myths About Your Body by Sarah Warren, CSE

September 9, 2012 Articles
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Myth: Lumbar supports are good for your back. Reality: If your lower back is tight, a chair with a good lumbar support feels great. Sitting without a lumbar support can be uncomfortable because your tight back muscles are being pulled and stretched. A lumbar support brings your lower back into an arched position in which […]

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Overuse vs. Misuse: Understanding Overuse Injuries by Sarah Warren, CSE

July 27, 2012 Articles
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Conditions such as tendonitis, bursitis, shin splints, plantar fasciitis, joint pain, disc problems, and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome are very often attributed to overuse. Clients come to me with these conditions all the time having been told by their doctor to take time off from their sport or favorite activity to allow their injury to heal. […]

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The Truth About Stretching By Sarah Warren, CSE

June 16, 2012 Articles
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From the ages of twelve to twenty-one, I was a ballet dancer. It was all I did and all I wanted to do. Being extremely disciplined, I stretched for half an hour every night before bed so I could get more flexible. And it worked – I got pretty darn flexible. Even on vacations, I […]

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What’s really causing your shoulder pain? By Sarah Warren, CSE

April 15, 2012 Articles
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In conditions of chronic muscle or joint pain, the standard approach is to address the area where pain is being felt. But often, a movement pattern or postural pattern is the underlying cause of the pain. If the pain is relieved with medication, spot therapy, or surgery, it is likely to come back because the […]

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Imaginary Tigers: The effects of our ancient stress responses in the modern day world, Part 2 By Sarah Warren, CSE

March 2, 2012 Articles
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In the first part of Imaginary Tigers, we learned how our stress responses can lead to chronic stress, and how we can learn to perceive stressful situations differently in order to avoid chronic stress and the health risks that go along with it. Now we’ll discuss the ways in which stress leads to chronic muscle […]

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Imaginary Tigers: The effects of our ancient stress responses in the modern day world, Part I By Sarah Warren, CSE

February 13, 2012 Articles
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Many of us are in a state of chronic stress, and we have evolution to blame. Ideally, our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system maintain a balance — action followed by relaxation. When we perceive stress, our sympathetic nervous system initiates a “fight or flight” reaction, restricting blood flow, raising blood pressure, releasing adrenaline and cortisol, […]

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